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Professor Philip Gross wins Cholmondeley Award 2017

Posted on June 22, 2017 by

Poet Philip Gross is one of the winners of this year’s Cholmondeley Awards. Philip-Gross

The Awards are given by the Society of Authors in recognition of a poet’s body of work and their contribution to poetry. The other winners were Caroline Bergvall, Sasha Dugdale and Paula Meehan. Each writer receives £2,000, from a fund founded by the late Dowager Marchioness of Cholmondeley in 1966 to recognise the achievement and distinction of individual poets.

Professor Gross won the T.S. Eliot Prize for Poetry (2009), has been shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize (2001) and received a PBS Recommendation (2001). He has collaborated with numerous artists and his experience of words and silence in his Quaker beliefs are reflected in his work.

The awards are judged by writers and this year’s assessors were Paul Farley, Rod Mengham and Pascale Petit. Mimi Khalvati said of Professor Gross’s work: 'In exploring his fascination in language and wordlessness, he constantly delights us with his acute acts of seeing and his boundless verbal imagination.’

Professor Gross said: 'This is a real affirmation – not a prize for a single poem or even for a single book, but for a whole body of writing, in my case, work of nearly forty years (and still counting).’

Professor Philip Gross wins Cholmondeley Award 2017

Posted on June 22, 2017 by

Poet Philip Gross is one of the winners of this year’s Cholmondeley Awards.

The Awards are given by the Society of Authors in recognition of a poet’s body of work and their contribution to poetry. The other winners were Caroline Bergvall, Sasha Dugdale and Paula Meehan. Each writer receives £2,000, from a fund founded by the late Dowager Marchioness of Cholmondeley in 1966 to recognise the achievement and distinction of individual poets.

Professor Gross won the T.S. Eliot Prize for Poetry (2009), has been shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize (2001) and received a PBS Recommendation (2001). He has collaborated with numerous artists and his experience of words and silence in his Quaker beliefs are reflected in his work.

The awards are judged by writers and this year’s assessors were Paul Farley, Rod Mengham and Pascale Petit. Mimi Khalvati said of Professor Gross’s work: 'In exploring his fascination in language and wordlessness, he constantly delights us with his acute acts of seeing and his boundless verbal imagination.’

Professor Gross said: 'This is a real affirmation – not a prize for a single poem or even for a single book, but for a whole body of writing, in my case, work of nearly forty years (and still counting).’

Dr. Jenny Maher hosts International Environmental Crime Conference

Posted on June 9, 2017 by

The 4th International Environmental Crime Conference will be held at the University of South Wales on 12th September in Cardiff, Wales, UK.

This year’s theme is Environmental Crime and Technology, and we are pleased to welcome four distinguished keynote speakers:

Professor Reece Walters,
Queensland University of Technology,
Faculty of Law, Brisbane,
Queensland, Australia

Dr Anita Lavorgna
University of Southampton,
Southampton,
UK

Professor Tim Boekhout Van Solinge,
Independent Criminologist
The Netherlands

Dr. Federico Magalini
United Nations University
Institute for Environment and Human Security,
Bonn, Germany

The conference will utilise ‘ignite’ presentations for researchers and practitioners to highlight current research and technologies.

The International Environmental Crime Conference showcases leading research that highlights the intersection between Technology and Environmental Crime. In particular, it focuses on the way technology is used to facilitate and perpetrate environmental crime and respond to its challenges.

Previously hosted in the Netherlands, the International Environmental Crime Conference brings together academics, practitioners and policy makers from various disciplines to exchange views, concepts and research findings. Discussions are informed by perspectives from green criminology, sociology, law enforcement, community wellbeing, policy, environmental activism and law enforcement, organised crime and victimology.

Environmental crime is one of the most profitable and fastest growing crimes internationally. Heightened awareness of the proliferation and scale of the harms involved is altering the way we view and interact with our world. In particular, people and places are linked in new ways through the rise of e-waste, transnational transportation and dumping of toxic waste, systematic and accidental pollution, and the illegal trafficking and destruction of flora and fauna, as examples. These crimes are interconnected and intertwined with technology. ‘Neutral’ technologies are utilised and applied, on the one hand to create and facilitate environmental harms, and on the other to provide innovative and vital solutions. From UAVs, satellite monitoring, big-data and smartphones to e-waste, GMOs and the internet trade in wildlife – technology continues to change the face of, and responses to, environmental crime.

This conference is organised by Jennifer Maher (University of South Wales), Toine Spapens (Tilburg University, Daan van Uhm (Utrecht University), Tanya Wyatt (Northumbria University), and Rob White (University of Tasmania).

Please direct any questions to the conference host Dr. Jenny Maher

You can also find further details about the conference here

Wales Institute of Mathematical and Computational Science (WIMCS) conference 2016

Posted on June 8, 2017 by

The annual Wales Institute of Mathematical and Computational Science (WIMCS) conference welcomed lectures and researchers from Welsh Universities at the end of May. Lecturers from the University of South Wales’s Mathematics department were amongst those who were guest speakers, presenting at Gregynog Hall, Newtown.

The annual Wales Institute of Mathematical and Computational Science (WIMCS) conference welcomed lectures and researchers from Welsh Universities at the end of May. Lecturers from the University of South Wales’s Mathematics department were amongst those who were guest speakers, presenting at Gregynog Hall, Newtown.

Dr James Kent and Dr Nick Gill, from USW, presented “Assessing Advection Schemes in Numerical Models of Atmosphere,” and “On Cherlin’s Conjecture,” respectively.

Other invited speakers were, Professor Anne Juel from The University of Manchester, presenting “Viscous fingering under elastic membranes,” and “Using inkjet printing to deposit lines of fluid on flat surfaces and topography.”

Professor Darren Crowdy, from Imperial College London presented both, “The `Hole Story’ of a forgotten function,” and “The geometry of Fourier transforms.”

Also speaking, from The University of Edinburgh, Tom Leinster presented both, “The many faces of magnitude,” and “Magnitude in geometry: invariants old and new.”

For more information about our Mathematics courses, please visit: http://www.southwales.ac.uk/study/subjects/mathematics/

Nick Gill delivers lectures in Nepal

Posted on June 8, 2017 by

Dr Nick Gill, a mathematics lecturer from the University of South Wales, was awarded a London Mathematical Society (LMS) grant to visit Tribhuvan University in Nepal. During his recent visit, Dr Gill delivered six lectures to postgraduate students, as part of a Galois Theory course at Masters Level.

This course originated from a six-year project, starting this summer and ending in 2021. Each course will be offered at the Tribhuvan University by several lecturers from developed countries. Dr Gill’s exciting opportunity to be a part of this project marked the halfway point of the course, with students preparing for their mid-term exam in one week, after which the course will restart, with the next module to be taught by Prof Michel Waldschmidt from Paris VI.

A significant percentage of the students are mature students, who studied undergraduate mathematics some time ago, and have returned to further study to develop themselves professionally after subsequently working as teachers.

Find out more about Mathematics at the University of South Wales.

Lisa Barnard speaks at practice based research symposium

Posted on May 31, 2017 by


Dr Rob Campbell is interviewed in today’s South Wales Argus

Posted on May 30, 2017 by

Dr Rob Campbell, Academic Manager for Broadcasting & Journalism at USW, is interviewed in today’s South Wales Argus (p.62) in a feature on how the regional newspaper industry may change in the future.


Dr Rob Campbell is interviewed in today’s South Wales Argus

Posted on May 30, 2017 by

Dr Rob Campbell, Academic Manager for Broadcasting & Journalism at USW, is interviewed in today’s South Wales Argus (p.62) in a feature on how the regional newspaper industry may change in the future.


Dr Mike on Virtual reality app to teach road safety to children

Posted on May 22, 2017 by

“An app using similar technology to Pokemon Go is being developed to help teach road safety to primary school children.” BBC News

“An app using similar technology to Pokemon Go is being developed to help teach road safety to primary school children. Pupils will be able to learn road-crossing skills through the “virtual reality” game. The app has been developed by University of South Wales (USW) academics, who have received £67,500 funding from the Road Safety Trust.” BBC News

Dr Andy Smith presents paper at the BFI symposium in London

Posted on May 16, 2017 by

Dr Andy Smith, Associate Head of the School of Music and Performance at the University of South Wales, is going to be delivering a paper titled “Which shall prevail?” Doppelgängers and Duality in the work of David Rudkin at the BFI symposium in London on 10 June 2017.

This paper will explore the themes of doubling, duality and doppelgängers in the work of David Rudkin, with specific reference to Ashes (1974), Penda’s Fen (1974) and The Sons of Light (1977). Images and references to doubling abound in Rudkin’s work: the duality of existence through sexuality, Eros and Thanatos, science and religion, the sacred and the profane reoccur as significant thematic and structural forms. Characters such as Stephan in Penda’s Fen and Colin in Ashes sever themselves from communities and families due to unresolved and ambiguous homoerotic desires. In The Sons of Light, this duality is reflected in its spatial environment – a nightmarish evocation of two worlds inhabited by two sets of repressed and deformed societies. Above the ground, an archaic and enclosed religious community mourning the deaths of its drowned children. The other, an underground secret government military complex known as the Pit, a nightmarish world run by sadistic guards who engage in the eroticised torture of escaped slaves. The concept of Manicheanism – an ancient Persian religion that believed the world was a constant battleground between light and dark, good and evil – is key to exploring how Rudkin sets in motion the concept of duality in his drama, incorporating primeval faith, modern psychology and the separation of body and soul. Rudkin’s deployment of dual narratives contains an implicit critique of how normality is constructed in our society, and how violence is ritualised in order to cleanse what is considered profane. Through exploring Rudkin’s use of duality and the influence of Manicheanism in his work, this paper will argue that his epic, poetic and personal evocations of human experience are vital to our understanding of contemporary British drama.

Download the symposium programme.

Joanna Vestey's images at Venice

Posted on May 8, 2017 by

Three images from Joanna Vestey’s Custodians series will be shown at the PERSONAL STRUCTURES – open borders exhibition in Venice, 13 May - 26 November 2017 (preview 11-12 May 2017).

Find the full press release here.

Review of Common Culture's Bluecoat exhibition in Art Monthly

Posted on May 2, 2017 by

Dr Márta Minier co-organises a Welsh-Hungarian Music Day in memory of Zoltán Kodály

Posted on April 27, 2017 by

Dr Márta Minier, an active member of the Music Media Drama Research Group, is involved as a consultant co-organiser and educator in a Welsh-Hungarian Music Day organised in memory of eminent Hungarian composer and ethnomusicologist Zoltán Kodály (6 May 2017, Canton Uniting Church, Cardiff). In 2017 Hungarians commemorate the 50th anniversary of Kodaly’s death, who pioneered a music education system – the famous Kodály Method – that revolutionised the teaching of music to children well beyond his native Hungary. Kodály, who is equally reputed as a composer, a folk song collector and a pedagogue, is a Hungarian cultural export much appreciated in Wales. Testimony to this is the Kodaly Violin School based in Carmarthenshire, who are co-organisers of this bilingual event. Dr Minier’s expertise in Hungarian studies and in education is pivotal to the event.

For bookings please visit Eventbrite.

Dr Márta Minier co-organises a Welsh-Hungarian Music Day in memory of Zoltán Kodály

Posted on April 27, 2017 by

Dr Márta Minier, an active member of the Centre for Media and Culture in Small Nations, is involved as a consultant co-organiser and educator in a Welsh-Hungarian Music Day organised in memory of eminent Hungarian composer and ethnomusicologist Zoltán Kodály (6 May 2017, Canton Uniting Church, Cardiff). In 2017 Hungarians commemorate the 50th anniversary of Kodaly’s death, who pioneered a music education system – the famous Kodály Method – that revolutionised the teaching of music to children well beyond his native Hungary. Kodály, who is equally reputed as a composer, a folk song collector and a pedagogue, is a Hungarian cultural export much appreciated in Wales. Testimony to this is the Kodaly Violin School based in Carmarthenshire, who are co-organisers of this bilingual event. Dr Minier’s expertise in Hungarian studies and in education is pivotal to the event.

For bookings please visit Eventbrite.

Prof. Ruth McElroy talks to the BBC about the accountability of the media in Wales.

Posted on April 27, 2017 by

Professor Ruth McElroy, co-director of the Centre for Media and Culture in Small Nations, talks to the BBC about the accountability of the media in Wales.

She told BBC Wales: “We have seen a great deal of closures of local newspapers. That’s been a long-standing theme, and it’s been greater in Wales than in the rest of the UK.

“I think what we have to do is be realistic that we are now in a digital age, and that modes of news delivery might be different in the future.”

She added ministers should be more prepared to intervene to support media in Wales.

“There definitely is a place for government intervention. I think that sometimes, in the UK, we have been hostile to that, almost ideologically.

“In other parts of the world they are not, and they are reaping the benefits as a result.”


Prof. Ruth McElroy talks to the BBC about the accountability of the media in Wales.

Posted on April 27, 2017 by

Professor Ruth McElroy, co-director of the Centre for Media and Culture in Small Nations, talks to the BBC about the accountability of the media in Wales.

She told BBC Wales: “We have seen a great deal of closures of local newspapers. That’s been a long-standing theme, and it’s been greater in Wales than in the rest of the UK.

“I think what we have to do is be realistic that we are now in a digital age, and that modes of news delivery might be different in the future.”

She added ministers should be more prepared to intervene to support media in Wales.

“There definitely is a place for government intervention. I think that sometimes, in the UK, we have been hostile to that, almost ideologically.

“In other parts of the world they are not, and they are reaping the benefits as a result.”


Professor Meredith Elected as Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales

Posted on April 27, 2017 by

Novelist and poet Christopher Meredith, Emeritus Professor of Creative Writing at USW, is one of the new Fellows elected to the Learned Society of Wales.

Election to Fellowship of the Learned Society of Wales is a public recognition of academic excellence, and LSW Fellowship is keenly competed. By bringing together the most successful and talented Fellows connected with Wales, the LSW contributes to advancing and promoting excellence in all scholarly disciplines including the arts and humanities. The Society now has more than 460 Fellows, distinguished men and women from all branches of learning who are prominent figures within their respective academic disciplines or professions.

The award-winning author of four novels and four collections of poetry, Professor Meredith also translates from Welsh to English. His most recent books are the novel, The Book of Idiots, and a collection of poems, Air Histories. Both are published by Seren. His first novel, Shifts, set against the decline of the steel industry in south Wales, is now regarded as a contemporary classic and has remained in print ever since its first publication in 1988. In 2014 Shifts was shortlisted for the title of 'Greatest Welsh Novel of All Time’ by Wales Arts Review.

Professor Meredith said, ‘I’m pleased and honoured to have been accepted as a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales. I always quietly thought of myself as a learned fellow, but never expected to become a Learned Fellow. It’s flattering to get into upper case in the company of colleagues from USW who’ve already achieved this honour, such as Jane Aaron, Jeremy Hooker and Diana Wallace.’

Dr Emily Underwood-Lee was interviewed on BBC Radio Wales

Posted on April 26, 2017 by

Dr Emily Underwood-Lee featured on BBC Radio Wales’ Telling Tales programme to talk about the value of storytelling and how the George Ewart Evans Centre for Storytelling Centre shares the legacy of oral historian George Ewart Evans.

You can listen to the broadcasts here: Episode 1 and Episode 2.

Dr Emily Underwood-Lee featured on BBC Radio Wales

Posted on April 25, 2017 by

Dr Emily Underwood-Lee featured on 'Telling Tales’ BBC Radio Wales programme to talk about the value of storytelling and how the George Ewart Evans Centre for Storytelling Centre shares the legacy of oral historian George Ewart Evans.

You can listen to the broadcasts here: Episode 1 and Episode 2.

Dr Russell Roberts curates exhibition of Photographs of the Free Wales Army

Posted on April 25, 2017 by

As part of the third Diffusion International Photography Festival in Cardiff, eCDR’s Director – Dr Russell Roberts, has curated an exhibition of photographs used in the 1969 court case of the Crown versus the Free Wales Army (FWA). The exhibition – Hidden Country: Photographs of the Free Wales Army 1966-69, is a collaboration with the National Library of Wales and consists of facsimile prints that show how both police and paramilitary groups used photography as visual evidence and as propaganda. These images belong to an important moment of 'direct action’ in Welsh history, underlining the power of images to both incriminate but also to disrupt the political landscape.

For further details about the exhibition, please see here.